A year spent saving lives

2019 in photographs

A woman in green scrubs stands outside the Ebola treametnecentre

A member of staff takes a moment outside the Ebola Transit Center in Bunia, DRC Photo: Pablo Garrigos / MSF

A member of staff takes a moment outside the Ebola Transit Center in Bunia, DRC Photo: Pablo Garrigos / MSF

In 2019, our teams were there for people living through crises in 70 different countries.

Whilst these pictures cannot capture the breadth of our work, they are part of our témoignage, our bearing witness, to the dignity and resilience of our patients, to the fortitude of our staff, and to the life-saving generosity of our donors around the world.

An MSF nurse and patient share a hug

January: A woman hugs MSF nurse mentor Chrissie Nasiyo during an outreach clinic conducted for sex workers in Nsanje, Malawi. The clinic offers a comprehensive package of health services, including HIV and STI testing and treatment, counselling, TB screening and referral, family planning, care for victims of sexual violence, and cervical cancer screening. "For someone to say ‘I’m a sex worker’ can be difficult because of the culture, the stigma, the discrimination that goes with it," says Chrissie. "Many of their health issues are related to a lack of information. We can help them protect themselves." Photo: Isabel Corthier/MSF

January: A woman hugs MSF nurse mentor Chrissie Nasiyo during an outreach clinic conducted for sex workers in Nsanje, Malawi. The clinic offers a comprehensive package of health services, including HIV and STI testing and treatment, counselling, TB screening and referral, family planning, care for victims of sexual violence, and cervical cancer screening. "For someone to say ‘I’m a sex worker’ can be difficult because of the culture, the stigma, the discrimination that goes with it," says Chrissie. "Many of their health issues are related to a lack of information. We can help them protect themselves." Photo: Isabel Corthier/MSF

Aerial view of the floods in Buzi

In the early hours of 14 March, Cyclone Idai reaped havoc in Mozambique. The town of Buzi was heavily hit by flooding, with many residents forced to take “refuge” on roofs or in trees in order to avoid being swept away by the flood waters.

A member of the MSF emergency team leaves a helicopter

On 25 of March an MSF emergency team of medics and logisticians was finally able to reach Buzi by helicopter to start assessing people's needs. The town had no electricity and no access to clean water. Virtually all homes had been damaged or destroyed. The following evening, MSF sent two planes with a total of 45 tons of equipment to Mozambique. This shipment included cholera treatment supplies to enable the response to an outbreak that was declared officially on the day the plane landed, on 27 March. Photo: MSF / Pablo Garrigos

Aerial view of the floods in Buzi

In the early hours of 14 March, Cyclone Idai reaped havoc in Mozambique. The town of Buzi was heavily hit by flooding, with many residents forced to take “refuge” on roofs or in trees in order to avoid being swept away by the flood waters.

A member of the MSF emergency team leaves a helicopter

On 25 of March an MSF emergency team of medics and logisticians was finally able to reach Buzi by helicopter to start assessing people's needs. The town had no electricity and no access to clean water. Virtually all homes had been damaged or destroyed. The following evening, MSF sent two planes with a total of 45 tons of equipment to Mozambique. This shipment included cholera treatment supplies to enable the response to an outbreak that was declared officially on the day the plane landed, on 27 March. Photo: MSF / Pablo Garrigos

A hospital worker shows a bullet on a piece of guarze

In April, Mohammed, 18, was sitting in a street in Hodeidah, Yemen around 4.00pm when he was injured by a stray bullet. He was treated by the MSF team working in the ER and operating theatre - luckily the bullet had not touched his spinal cord. Photo: Agnes Varraine-Leca/MSF

In April, Mohammed, 18, was sitting in a street in Hodeidah, Yemen around 4.00pm when he was injured by a stray bullet. He was treated by the MSF team working in the ER and operating theatre - luckily the bullet had not touched his spinal cord. Photo: Agnes Varraine-Leca/MSF

Four men look out of a detention centre in Libya

These men, who our teams met in May, were among the 5-6,000 refugees and migrants who are arbitrarily held in Libya’s detention centres, often in dire conditions, and with no way to escape Libya's armed conflict. In this centre in Zintan, south of Tripol, at least 22 had died in the previous nine months. MSF started to provide medical care and food, and to improve the water and sewage system. MSF UK has called on the UK government to end the harmful policies which keep people trapped in centres like this. Photo: Jérôme Tubiana/MSF

These men, who our teams met in May, were among the 5-6,000 refugees and migrants who are arbitrarily held in Libya’s detention centres, often in dire conditions, and with no way to escape Libya's armed conflict. In this centre in Zintan, south of Tripol, at least 22 had died in the previous nine months. MSF started to provide medical care and food, and to improve the water and sewage system. MSF UK has called on the UK government to end the harmful policies which keep people trapped in centres like this. Photo: Jérôme Tubiana/MSF

MSF staff in a Bunia Ebola project put on protective suits

In June, multiple crises unfolded in Ituri province, northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo, putting hundreds of thousands of people in urgent need of humanitarian assistance. An uspsurge in violence, a massive measles outbreak, and the height of the malaria season all hit communities already facing an Ebola epidemic. Our teams were on the ground. In this photo, a staff member puts on a protective suit before going into the high risk zone of the Ebola Transit Center in Bunia. Photo: Pablo Garrigos / MSF

In June, multiple crises unfolded in Ituri province, northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo, putting hundreds of thousands of people in urgent need of humanitarian assistance. An uspsurge in violence, a massive measles outbreak, and the height of the malaria season all hit communities already facing an Ebola epidemic. Our teams were on the ground. In this photo, a staff member puts on a protective suit before going into the high risk zone of the Ebola Transit Center in Bunia. Photo: Pablo Garrigos / MSF

Dr Valerie Weiss cares for a child with meningitis

MSF doctor Valerie Weiss photographed this July, taking care of a young meningitis patient in Zamfara State, Nigeria. Thousands of people from all over Zamfara have been forced to flee their homes. They report harrowing violence, including stories of extortion, kidnapping and killings. Unable to return to their homes and farms, they have taken refuge in the few safer places left. In the town of Anka, MSF runs a 135-bed paediatric ward at Anka general hospital, mainly treating children for malnutrition and malaria.

MSF doctor Valerie Weiss photographed this July, taking care of a young meningitis patient in Zamfara State, Nigeria. Thousands of people from all over Zamfara have been forced to flee their homes. They report harrowing violence, including stories of extortion, kidnapping and killings. Unable to return to their homes and farms, they have taken refuge in the few safer places left. In the town of Anka, MSF runs a 135-bed paediatric ward at Anka general hospital, mainly treating children for malnutrition and malaria.

An inflatable boat full of people floats in the Mediterranean

In August, MSF and SOS MEDITERRANEE launched the search and rescue ship Ocean Viking. A sustained campaign by European governments had forced us to halt our humanitarian work in the Mediterranean at the end of 2018. In the first six months of 2019, at least 426 people died attempting to escape Libya by sea, often in flimsy inflatable boats like this one. By November 2019, Ocean Viking had assisted 1152 people at sea. Photo: Hannah Wallace-Bowman

A baby sleeps in a makeshift crib onboard the Ocean Viking

This little girl was rescued from a wooden boat in the Mediterranean on September 17, at just 4 days old, along with her mother and older brother. Photo: Hannah Wallace-Bowman / MSF

An inflatable boat full of people floats in the Mediterranean

In August, MSF and SOS MEDITERRANEE launched the search and rescue ship Ocean Viking. A sustained campaign by European governments had forced us to halt our humanitarian work in the Mediterranean at the end of 2018. In the first six months of 2019, at least 426 people died attempting to escape Libya by sea, often in flimsy inflatable boats like this one. By November 2019, Ocean Viking had assisted 1152 people at sea. Photo: Hannah Wallace-Bowman

A baby sleeps in a makeshift crib onboard the Ocean Viking

This little girl was rescued from a wooden boat in the Mediterranean on September 17, at just 4 days old, along with her mother and older brother. Photo: Hannah Wallace-Bowman / MSF

Pooja Iyer and a young Rohingya patient

For MSF mental health manager Pooja Iyer, who works with Rohingya refugees in our project in Jamtoli, Bangladesh, hope is seeing her young patients recover from trauma suffered in Myanmar. The Rohingya are a persecuted ethnic minority, and almost a million have been living in make-shift camps in Bangladesh since being forced to flee an upsurge in violent attacks in Myanmar in 2017. MSF counsellors work with both child and adult patients, screening for mental health issues, providing individual and group counselling sessions and refering severe cases for more intensive care at the MSF hospital in Kutupalong.

For MSF mental health manager Pooja Iyer, who works with Rohingya refugees in our project in Jamtoli, Bangladesh, hope is seeing her young patients recover from trauma suffered in Myanmar. The Rohingya are a persecuted ethnic minority, and almost a million have been living in make-shift camps in Bangladesh since being forced to flee an upsurge in violent attacks in Myanmar in 2017. MSF counsellors work with both child and adult patients, screening for mental health issues, providing individual and group counselling sessions and refering severe cases for more intensive care at the MSF hospital in Kutupalong.

Activists hold up signs to protest the cost of bedaquiline

MSF's Access Campaign works to ensure that patients around the world can have access to the medication they desperately need. In October, activists protested outside the offices of pharmaceutical corporation Johnson & Johnson in Sao Paolo, Brazil, demanding the company reduce the price of bedaquiline, a key tuberculosis drug. More people die of tuberculosis every year than any other infectious disease, so better access to medication is vital. Photo: Julia Chequer / MSF

MSF's Access Campaign works to ensure that patients around the world can have access to the medication they desperately need. In October, activists protested outside the offices of pharmaceutical corporation Johnson & Johnson in Sao Paolo, Brazil, demanding the company reduce the price of bedaquiline, a key tuberculosis drug. More people die of tuberculosis every year than any other infectious disease, so better access to medication is vital. Photo: Julia Chequer / MSF

Galadriel Lopez Rozada, Emergency Nurse Coordinator, works on a mobile clinic in the flood-affected region of Ulang

In October, abnormally heavy rains plunged vast areas of northern and eastern South Sudan under water. MSF emergency teams worked around the clock to overcome logistical obstacles and provide support to the people in need of life-saving assistance. Here, Galadriel Lopez Rozada, Emergency Nurse Coordinator, works on a mobile clinic in the flood-affected region of Ulang Photo: Nicola Flamigni/MSF

In October, abnormally heavy rains plunged vast areas of northern and eastern South Sudan under water. MSF emergency teams worked around the clock to overcome logistical obstacles and provide support to the people in need of life-saving assistance. Here, Galadriel Lopez Rozada, Emergency Nurse Coordinator, works on a mobile clinic in the flood-affected region of Ulang Photo: Nicola Flamigni/MSF

The olive grove next to Moria camp, Lesvos

Right now, EU policy means nearly forty thousand people remain trapped in extremely overcrowded camps on the Greek islands. "They have survived war and persecution," says MSF international president Christos Christou, "but months in unsafe and miserable places like Moria camp have driven many of our child patients over the edge, to self-harm and thoughts of suicide." These photos were taken in Moria in January. MSF teams are there providing medical and mental health care. Photo: Anna Pantelia / MSF

 MSF doctor Leonidas Alexakis examines a child

MSF doctor Leonidas Alexakis examines a child in the MSF pediatric clinic outside Moria camp, on the island of Lesvos. MSF medical staff see around 80-100 children per day with illnesses directly related to living in such awful conditions. In November, the Greek government announced plans that Christi called even more "brutal", including converting the camps to detention centres and accelerating deportations. Photo: Anna Pantelia / MSF

The olive grove next to Moria camp, Lesvos

Right now, EU policy means nearly forty thousand people remain trapped in extremely overcrowded camps on the Greek islands. "They have survived war and persecution," says MSF international president Christos Christou, "but months in unsafe and miserable places like Moria camp have driven many of our child patients over the edge, to self-harm and thoughts of suicide." These photos were taken in Moria in January. MSF teams are there providing medical and mental health care. Photo: Anna Pantelia / MSF

 MSF doctor Leonidas Alexakis examines a child

MSF doctor Leonidas Alexakis examines a child in the MSF pediatric clinic outside Moria camp, on the island of Lesvos. MSF medical staff see around 80-100 children per day with illnesses directly related to living in such awful conditions. In November, the Greek government announced plans that Christi called even more "brutal", including converting the camps to detention centres and accelerating deportations. Photo: Anna Pantelia / MSF

Moses Luhanga, MSF Information Education and Communication Manager, shares a joke with Esther, a patient being treated for advanced HIV.

Moses Luhanga, MSF Information Education and Communication Manager, shares a joke with Esther, a patient being treated for advanced HIV. At the MSF hospital in Malawi where Esther is being treated, patients with advanced HIV are admitted to a rapid assessment unit and supported to start and stay on medication. We marked World AIDS Day this December by calling for improved treatment around the world for patients like Esther. Photo: Isabel Corthier / MSF

Moses Luhanga, MSF Information Education and Communication Manager, shares a joke with Esther, a patient being treated for advanced HIV. At the MSF hospital in Malawi where Esther is being treated, patients with advanced HIV are admitted to a rapid assessment unit and supported to start and stay on medication. We marked World AIDS Day this December by calling for improved treatment around the world for patients like Esther. Photo: Isabel Corthier / MSF

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